Correlations Between One Hundred Years Of Solitude And The Bible

2999 words - 12 pages

! It is with great ease to be able to read Gabriel Garcia Marquezʼ novel One
Hundred Years of Solitude and relate it to the Bible. Many scenarios in the novel
correspond to the stories we learn in religion class. In fact, many critics believe the
Bibleʼs plot provides a foundation for the novel. Lois Parkinson Zamora has said “Like
Revelation, One Hundred Years of Solitude sums up the Bible” (Bloom 51). Through
Remedios the Beauty, the foolish description of Fernanda del Carpio, modernization
resulting in solitude and disbelief, and the Garden of Eden Gabriel Garcia Marquez
creates a correlation between the Bible and One Hundred Years of Solitude. It is not the
correlations between these books that make for an interesting discussion, however. The
interesting aspect is to consider why Garcia Marquez thought it necessary to create
such correlations. As the correlations between the two books are dissected many
questions develop. Does the plot of the Bible serve only to provide humor, a satire, or is
there more behind the correlation? Do all these correlations point to bigger questions?
In this paper the simple correlations will be discussed and how it results in a fictional
satire. Further correlations will then be analyzed to such a degree that will help us
understand Garcia Marquezʼ true intent.
! In the very beginning of One Hundred Years of Solitude Gabriel Garcia Marquez
speaks of a place so young every creature lacked a name. This correlates to the
Garden of Eden, where the power of naming everything and creating a world that fit into
his ideology was given to Adam. “And out of the ground the Lord God formed every
beast of the field, and every fowl of the air; and brought them unto Adam to see what he
would call them: and whatsoever Adam called every living creature, that was the name
thereof” (Genesis 2:19) (The bible for dummies). This is the beginning of Garcia
Marquez creating a satirical fiction, a parody between One Hundred years of Solitude
and the Bible as Garcia Marquez begins to explain the newness of the world: “The
World was so recent that many things lacked names, and in order to indicate them it
was necessary to point” (One hundred years of Solitude, p1). This very first line in the
novel establishes Macondo as a kind of Eden, recalling the biblical tale of Adam naming
the animals.
! Garcia also touches upon the idea of forbidden knowledge. In a world were we
associate technology with the progression forward, Garcia Marquez takes the concept
and dismantles it. There is a direct parallel between the demise of Macondo and the
invasion of technology and modernization (Conde). This can be seen through the
Buendía family. As inventions begin to pour into the lives of the people of Macondo the
novel expands to its largest scope, filled with the most characters, more opinions than
ever before, more events to keep track of. The novel now seems to be very crowded,
filled with a confusing multiplicity...

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