European Colonization During The Nineteenth Century

903 words - 4 pages

Motivation for Expansion

During the nineteenth century, the Industrial Revolution gave certain countries in Western Europe a big boost of economic power. France, Britain, Italy, and Germany emerged as industrialized powers, with high population and high production. During a time when Social Darwinism was popular, it was only natural that these nations compete with each other for survival. The most important motivation for Europeans to colonize during the 19th and 20th centuries was to strengthen their own countries in order to compete with the other European powers.

One of the major ways a colony can strengthen a nation is by providing it with another economic market. As a result of Industrialization, production was too high for consumer demand in Europe. Jules Ferry wrote an appeal to the French, urging colonization. In his appeal he wrote, "The European consumer-goods market is saturated: unless we declare modern society bankrupt and prepare, at the dawn of he twentieth century, for its liquidation by revolution (the consequences of which we can scarcely foresee), new consumer markets will have to be created in other parts of the world" (pg.259 source3). Meaning that unless there is another market to sell national products to, then employment could decline drastically within the nation and eventually cause revolution. Englishman, Joseph Chamberlain, once gave a speech to the Birmingham Relief Association in 1894. In this speech Chamberlain stated, "That in order that we may have more employment to give we must create more demand" (pg.259 source4). This proves that the idea of a foreign market as a means of economic power was widespread among Europeans at the time. Both an Englishman and a Frenchmen used the same argument in pushing for colonization. There were only so many potential colonies around the world, and if one colony could bring another economic market to one country, that colony could not produce the same for another. This is one reason why the main motivation in obtaining these colonies was to compete with other imperialist nations.

Another reason why a colony could strengthen a nation is because of the raw materials a colony could produce. These colonies could be used to grow mass quantities of cotton for textile factories, or other cash crops like sugar and tobacco. In his speech, Joseph Chamberlain was trying to convince the public that Britain should colonize Uganda. One of his main reasons was because of the potential Uganda had for producing raw materials. He said, "It (Uganda) contains every variety of climate; in a large portion of it European colonization is perfectly feasible; the products are of the utmost richness; there is hardly anything which is of value or use to us in our...

Find Another Essay On European Colonization During the Nineteenth Century

In what ways did melodrama as a cultural form speak to the concerns of American theatregoers during the nineteenth century?

2773 words - 11 pages In what ways did melodrama as a cultural form speak to the concerns of American theatregoers during the nineteenth century? Discuss Augustin Daly's sensational melodrama "Under The Gaslight" and the ways in which it negotiates the issues of class and ethnicity in nineteenth century New York.This essay will look at melodrama in the nineteenth century. It will establish whether the issues of class and ethnicity were included in the melodramas

Reasons for Australian Federation Question: Discuss the reasons for and against federation that were considered during the late nineteenth century.

958 words - 4 pages . When trains were the main means of long-distance transport, having to change trains at the border of each colony was a great inconvenience for travellers. If the colonies federated, a uniform gauge would be developed, allowing trains to cross colonial borders. The growth of nationalism towards the end of the nineteenth century was a considerable factor in securing a federated Australia. In 1891, Sir Henry Parkes said, "Aren't we not one

Republicans and Democrats How evenly balanced were the Democratic and Republican Parties during the late nineteenth century? How did this balance flow from different regional and sociocultural bases?

660 words - 3 pages belonged to that party. Whatever the reason, most of the Americans during the era of the late nineteenth century were attached to their parties with great persistence and passion.Source:Brinkley, Alan. "American History: A Survey Tenth Edition." McGraw-Hill College. 1999

Immigration patterns of the United States. This essay deals with the the role of women, labor conditions, and the growth of labor unions during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century

627 words - 3 pages , while women's wages were also gradually rising. These were important keys to the wave of immigration during the late nineteenth century. The aforementioned conditions proved that America's economy had been established as a stable and trustworthy market.

Compare and Contrast the Attitudes of Andrew Carnegie, Eugene V. Debs and Booker T. Washington Towards the New Wealth Created in America During the Late Nineteenth Century - Bibliography Included!

1415 words - 6 pages T. Washington. Seemingly similar people, and yet they were almost completely different. One was a well-known philanthropist who was one of the richest men in world, another was an educator and an advocate of Black advancement and the last a socialist and labor activist (Encarta). Their attitudes on the wealth of America during the late nineteenth century may have looked different, since they seemed to be completely different people and with

Opera in the Nineteenth Century

999 words - 4 pages Italy. During the nineteenth century, opera stories most of the time was had a theme of passion and romance. That is one of the reasons that this century is also called Romantic Era. What is opera? Opera is a theatrical work that was set to music for people to sing. People that sing regular music probably never tried to sing opera because the singers never had a microphone to use and the opera houses that they did the operas in was big so they had

Tuberculosis in the Nineteenth Century

869 words - 4 pages the beginning of the nineteenth century, this is when ''essentialist" explanations of tuberculosis predominated (27). He continues on and examines the early societal and epidemiological analyses of hygienists, concentrating especially on Villemin, the leading figure of the "party of hygiene" during the July Monarchy. Barnes also talks about the societies controversy of Villemin's 1865 experiments. These experiments were trying to show the

Women in the Nineteenth Century

906 words - 4 pages No matter what time period women are in they do not have as much freedom as men do and they aren’t treated equally. Back in the late nineteenth century women didn’t have as much freedom as they do now days. This is seen through “Neighbour Rosicky” and “The Yellow Wall-Paper”. However in “A Sweat-Shop Romance” and “Daisy Miller” we see some change in what women can and can’t do and how they are seen outside of home. Throughout this essay the

European Colonization in Shakespeare's The Tempest

1306 words - 5 pages No Critique of European Colonization in The Tempest    Since the 1960s, several critics have found a critique of colonialism in their respective readings of Shakespeare's The Tempest. The most radical of these analyses takes Prospero to be a European invader of the magical but primitive land that he comes to rule, using his superior knowledge to enslave its original inhabitants, most notably Caliban, and forcing them to do his bidding

The American Dream in the Nineteenth Century

1011 words - 4 pages anti-immigration laws like The Page Law of 1875 and the Chinese Exclusion Act. European Immigrants on the other hand were targets of substantial prejudice and resentment. Americans also were convinced that the new immigrants were taking their jobs away which caused some hatred on the new immigrants. The wave of immigration in the late nineteenth century brought many conflicts in regards to religion and race. At that time America was mainly

"Folk" Resistance in the Nineteenth Century

1007 words - 4 pages Latin America in the nineteenth century was a time that was not well documented for the lower class. In fact, the only references to the culture of the lower class or "folk" were from oral history, poems, elite writings about the folk society, and from secondary sources. One source Poverty of Progress, by E. Bradford Burns, captures the ideals and thoughts of the folk culture in Latin America during the nineteenth century as well as the people's

Similar Essays

Gender Roles During T He Nineteenth Century

1594 words - 7 pages During the Nineteenth Century, the gender roles were greatly divided. Women were seen to have a completely differently status and nature from men. The stereotypical woman during this time-period was dependent, passive, domestic, and far weaker then a man. Men on the other hand, were far more dominant, dependent, controlling, ambitious and active. Men were the protectors and providers for the family. As if women weren’t already inferior enough

Feminism In Canadian Teaching During The Nineteenth Century

2695 words - 11 pages The word feminism can be defined as "a philosophy advocating rights and opportunities for women which are equal to those that exist for men." Feminism has always been a part of history in Canada; it has meant different things to different people at different times. During the nineteenth century, women struggled to be recognizably equal to men; however this struggle led back to the main issue of gender. Gender is fundamental to the ways we

What Attracted European Imperialism To Africa & To Asia In The Late Nineteenth Century

1641 words - 7 pages Mortimer Chambers et al define imperialism as a European state's intervention in and continuing domination over a non-European territory. During the 'Scramble for Africa' in the late nineteenth century, the most powerful European nations desired to conquer, dominate and exploit African colonies with the hope of building an empire. According to Derrick Murphy, in 1875 only ten percent of Africa was occupied by European states. Twenty years later

Zionism's Change From A Passive Notion To An Active Ideology During The Nineteenth Century

2837 words - 11 pages Zionism's Change from a Passive Notion to an Active Ideology During the Nineteenth Century Although it has been a precondition of Jewish consciousness to believe that the emergence of a Modern political Zionist movement can be attributed to the rampant anti-Semitism suffered by the European Jews, this does not provide an adequate explanation. The entire history of the Jews can be defined by the way in which they suffered
Duffel Bags | Cold Skin – La creatura di Atlantide [HD] (2017) | 4 years ago IKnowThatGirl – Kylah Renee Girlfriend Lets BF