Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Essay

1151 words - 5 pages

A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen, is a play about a woman who realizes that she is worth more than she has been given credit. Her whole life she was treated like a little doll; too fragile to do anything serious, too frail to be troubled with real business. She was the wife, mother and homemaker. The only things she was perceived as capable of were running the home, raising the children and looking pretty. This was a common stereotype for women in the 1880’s. Women were treated as possessions, not people.
Women had a specific role they had to fill. They had to look just so, act just so, raise the children in a certain way, and keep up the house in a perfect way. Many women tried to fill this position of the “perfect housewife”. They wore corsets that put about 22 pounds of pressure on their internal organs, which caused cracked ribs, displacement of the liver and uterine prolapsed and collapsed lungs, all just to look the way men wanted them to. Women balanced their ever so busy family lives as well as their social lives. They stayed home to take care of the kids, while taking a break to have friends over for tea or coffee. Women had to be the picture of perfection.
Magazines were plastered with this picture of the “perfect housewife” which showed women with their corsets laced so tight that they couldn’t breathe, and mothers holding many children. The whole world bought into this picture of perfection. Luckily, there were advances made to make life a little easier. The world went from being producers to being consumers. Mail order catalogs made it easier for women to purchase the necessary items to keep her house running smoothly. It was expected to have a perfect house, and this simply made it easier to obtain.
At this time, men were the dominant gender. They provided for the family, made important decisions, and were the head of the household. Women were not allowed to even take out a loan without their husband’s approval. A woman without a man was not a true woman. She was just a poor, lost soul who lacked everything necessary of acquiring a husband.
The 1870’s were a time when woman leaving her family was unacceptable. Although more and more women were starting to realize that they had greater worth. “That I no longer believe. I think that before all else I am a human being, just as much as you are--or, at least, I will try to become one. I know that most people agree with you, Torvald, and that they say so in books. But henceforth I can't be satisfied with what most people say, and what is in books. I must think things out for myself and try to get clear about them. . . . I had been living here these eight years with a strange man, and had borne him three children--Oh! I can't bear to think of it--I could...

Find Another Essay On Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

Henrik Ibsen's "A Doll's House" Essay

2009 words - 8 pages A close study of the techniques used to portray the characters of Ibsen's A Doll's House has led me to key insights in regard to the relationship between the individual and society in 19th century Europe. Society at this time was extremely patriarchal, where men were the leading figures in the community and household. Income, status and hence reputation were far more important than anything else to the majority. Women and wives were a distant

Henrik Ibsen's play, "A Doll's House"

752 words - 3 pages In Henrik Ibsen's play, "A Doll's House", the central theme is Nora's rebellion against society and everything that was expected of her. Nora shows this by breaking away from all the standards and expectations that her husband and society had set up for her. In her time, women were not supposed to be independent. They were to support their husband, take care of their children, cook, clean, make everything perfect around the house, and do

Nora's Symbolism in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

1060 words - 4 pages Nora's Symbolism in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House       In every society power is the bringer of fortune and influence. In his play A Doll's House, Henrik Ibsen portrays, through the character of Nora, the power women are gaining in patriarchal societies. Nora, who symbolizes all women, exercises her power throughout the entire play. She cleverly manipulates the men around her while, to them, she seems to be staying in her subordinate

The Heroic Nora Helmer in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

2683 words - 11 pages The Heroic Nora Helmer in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House   What does it mean to be a hero?  According to Webster, a hero is someone "of great strength [and] courage" who is "admired" for his or her "courage and nobility."1  Stretching this definition a bit further, I would argue that a hero is someone who uses this strength, courage, and nobility to help or save others.  Nora Helmer, in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House, leaves her husband

An Analysis of Irony in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

765 words - 3 pages In Henrik Ibsen's play A Doll's House, Torvald and his wife, Nora, live a middle class, conservative life with three children. Nora stays at home while Torvald works as a manager at a bank. Previously, when Torvald was sick, Nora forged her father's signature on a bond to receive money for a trip to Italy so Torvald could recover. Only Nils Krogstad, another man at the bank, and Nora's best friend, Linde, know about her terrible secret. Linde

Sympathy for Nora in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

2008 words - 8 pages Sympathy for Nora in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House In "A Doll's House," Henrik Ibsen primarily addresses issues not only relating to women in Norway, but to women embarking on twentieth century life in general. To achieve his desired effect, he employs the use of contextual dialog and places Nora as the central character, which gives her a great edge. Because of her prominent role throughout the play, she becomes familiar, and what is

Marriage Without Love in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

1566 words - 6 pages Marriage Without Love in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House In his play, 'A Doll?s House,' Henrik Ibsen shows a marriage built only on appearances, and not love. Both Nora the wife, and Torvald the husband, pretend they are in love throughout the story. However, love should be patient and kind, and their love is anything but that. Nora treats her husband as a father figure. Her feelings towards Torvald are more about dependence than

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll’s House

1388 words - 6 pages is a testament that many can receive understanding from. Works Cited Als, Hilton. "The Marrying Kind A new production of “A Doll’s House.”." The New Yorker 14 Mar. 2014: 70-71. Print Egan, Michael, B. C Southam, “Henrik Ibsen “ Collected Critical Heritage II. Oxfordshire: Taylor and Francis,1997, p110-113, 4p. Scott, Clement, Michael Egan, and B. C. Southam. "Part 1: A DOLL'S HOUSE: Chapter 17: An Unsigned Notice By Clement Scott In The Daily Telegraph." Henrik Ibsen (0-415-15950-4) (1997): 101-103. Literary Reference Center. Web. 30 Apr. 2014.

Comparing Men's Assumptions in Susan Glaspell's Trifles and Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

1284 words - 5 pages Glaspell's Trifles and Henrik Ibsen's A Doll House. The assumptions made by the men lead to conflicts in both plays. The men believe that women focus on trivial matters and are incapable of intelligent thinking, while the women quietly prove the men's assumptions to be completely incorrect. Works Cited and Consulted Chamberlain, John S. Ibsen: The Open Vision. 1982. Durbach, Errol. A Doll's House: Ibsen's Myth of Transformation. Boston

Ibsen, Henrik "A Doll's House"

1034 words - 4 pages his dishonest nature make him a poor example for his children, thus continuing the cycle of human corruption as he pollutes the rising generation.In conclusion, Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House is rich with symbolism. In his play, Ibsen uses complex characters to resemble society. The characters serve as symbols, each one generalizing a different breed of corruption. As the characters' faults become exposed, one realizes that it is not the flaw of

Henrik Ibsen A Doll's House

1455 words - 6 pages expectations. The play serves to remind its readers over and over again of this fact.Works Cited Durbach, Errol. A Doll's House: Ibsen's Myth of Transformation. Boston, MA: Twayne Publishing Co., 1991.Ibsen, Henrik. "A Doll's House." The Bedford Introduction to Literature. Ed.Michael Meyer. Boston, MA: Bedford, 1999.Templeton, Joan. Ibsen's Women. United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Similar Essays

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Essay

1283 words - 5 pages judicial systems across not only Europe, but also the world. As important as social and moral values are, women around the world are clearly working towards destroying the stigma and building a new representative, working class for all women, regardless of any limiting factor. A Doll’s House clearly aims to express the stigmas and society and suggest improvements toward a better future for all. Works Cited Ibsen, Henrik. "A Doll's House." Four Great Plays. Trans. R. Farquharson Sharp. New York: Bantam, 1959. 3-68. Print.

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Essay

954 words - 4 pages Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Ibsens's play is a modern tragedy which functions on two levels, questioning the established social order of the day and presenting the death of a marriage. Both these events create a great deal of tension, and combined with the language and actions used by the characters, make the play very intense. The main cause of dramatic tension throughout the play is the way that the difference between the real

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Essay

1313 words - 6 pages - a Play by Henrik Ibsen. Henry Holt and Company, n.d. Web. 24 May 2014. . Goldman, Emma. A Doll's House. A Doll's House. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 May 2014. . Wilde, Oscar. "The Picture of Dorian Gray." Google Books. Bernhard Tauchnitz, 8 May 2009. Web. 21 May 2014.

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Essay

1248 words - 5 pages Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Plot and Sub-plots The play begins on Christmas Eve of the late 19th century, in the living room of a middle class family, the Helmers. Nora is the female lead role in this play who is treated very child-like by her husband, Torvald. He appears to have taken over her father’s role which in turn allows their marriage to be built on unstable foundations and although both parties have each other’s best
Aru Tabibito no Nikki | DVD, Blu-ray, thuisbioscoop | Télécharger !