Kowalski And Dubois' Differing Values In A Streetcar Named Desire By Tennessee Williams

1693 words - 7 pages

Kowalski and Dubois' Differing Values in A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams

A Streetcar Named Desire is a play founded on the premise of conflicting cultures. Blanche and Stanley, the main antagonists of the play, have been brought up to harbour and preserve extremely disparate notions, to such an extent that their incompatibility becomes a recurring theme within the story. Indeed, their differing values and principles becomes the ultimate cause of antagonism, as it is their conflicting views that fuels the tension already brewing within the Kowalski household. Blanche, a woman disillusioned with the passing of youth and the dejection that loneliness inflicts upon its unwilling victims, breezes into her sister's modest home with the air and grace of a woman imbued with insecurity and abandonment. Her disapproval, concerning Stella's state of residence, is contrived in the face of a culture that disagrees with the old-fashioned principles of the southern plantations, a place that socialised Blanche to behave with the superior demeanour of a woman brain-washed into right-wing conservatism. Incomparably, she represents the old-world of the south, whilst Stanley is the face of a technology driven, machine fuelled, urbanised new-world that is erected on the foundations of immigration and cultural diversity. New Orleans provides such a setting for the play, emphasising the bygone attitude of Blanche whose refusal to part with the archaic morals of her past simply reiterates her lack of social awareness. In stark contrast Stanley epitomises the urban grit of modern society, revealed by his poker nights, primitive tendencies and resentment towards Blanche.
From the very moment that Blanche is introduced into the story, the reader is immediately endowed with the knowledge that she is an unstable, flighty character, whose fancy apparel – "a white suit, fluffy bodice, necklace and earrings of pearl" – marks her as incompatible within the new-world as she is "incongruous to the setting". Tennesse Williams utilises setting to expose his characters. Blanche's fallacy is highlighted by her inappropriate clothing, a discordance reinforced by the squalor of Stella's home. Indeed, Blanche's immediate "expression of shocked disbelief" when viewing the place for the first time, and her later condemnation of Elysian Fields, in which she says to her sister "what are you doing in a place like this?" and "why didn't you tell me that you had to live in these conditions?" reveals her superior attitude. It is evident that her upbringing in Belle Reve is the culprit for her presumptuous manner. However, Stella's polite civility in the face of her sister's overbearing supremacy shows that the principles of Dubois heritage have not manifested themselves in all its members. She is meek, almost resigned when confronted with such rudeness. She offers to...

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