Racism, Injustice, And Discrimination In Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird

2025 words - 8 pages

According to Shackleford, “The novel portrays a young girl's love for her father and brother and the experience of childhood during the Great Depression in a racist, segregated society, which uses superficial and materialistic values to judge outsiders, including the powerful character Boo Radley” (Shackelford). The main character relates closely with her father because he is the superior role model in her life. Having her mother die when she was very young caused her Dad to become a single parent, which caused him to hire help to assist him with the children. (Shackleford). For example, Atticus hired Calpurnia, the black housekeeper as a surrogate mother for the children (Lee 3). Lee describes racism in her novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. According to Felty, “Lee poses a limitation on her social critique in the novel, however, by directing it almost completely through the Finch family rather than through Tom Robinson and his family. This focus makes sense given the point of view of the novel, but it still keeps the Robinson family at a distance from the reader” (Felty). Lee bases how the reader views racism through the eyes of Scout and Atticus, the white characters, instead of Tom Robinson and the black characters. In the South, segregation was mutually distasteful because even in the justice system racism was still evident. According to Johnson, “Atticus' heroism is a quality that Maycomb's black population fully recognizes.
In the most carefully crafted and emotionally packed moment of the novel, as Atticus is leaving the courtroom after his defeat, simultaneously Scout realizes that all the spectators in the balcony are standing and is urged to her feet by the black preacher: “ `Miss Jean Louise, stand up. Your father's passin' '” (p. 214)” (Johnson). According to Watson, “In the slave-owning South and the Puritan-private north, [the porch] served for instance as a vital transition between the uncontrollable out-of-doors and the cherished interior of the home.... all [could] be conducted in the civil atmosphere offered by the shade of a prominent porch, apart from the sleeping and feeding quarters and without serious risk to the family's physical and psychic core…….One time, Atticus said you never really knew a man until you stood in his shoes and walked around in them. Just standin' on the Radley porch was enough.” The novel discusses how the African American community would not have any conversation for one of the main characters, Mayella Ewell, simply because she was white (Lee 19.162). The novel points out various areas where the racial epithet “nigger” or “nigger-lover” is used. Atticus discusses the term “nigger-lover” to Scout in chapter eleven, stating that ignorant trashy people use it and anyone who uses that term should be shameful (Lee 11.107-109). Jem and Scout experience racism first-hand when they attend church with Calpurnia when a member of the church says to Calpurnia “….., "You ain't got no business bringin' white...

Find Another Essay On Racism, Injustice, and Discrimination in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird

Courage in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird

771 words - 3 pages Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird is a timeless novel that has been both accepted and refused by many readers. To Kill a Mockingbird took place is a town called Maycomb. It is narrated by a young girl named Jean Louise Finch, otherwise known as Scout, who learns how to deal with many things in her life. While learning to deal with racism, injustice, and criticism, she also finds courage being showed by many of her role models. The theme

Scout's Childhood Simplicity in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird

715 words - 3 pages eyes and shows them, that they truly start to understand the world we live it. Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird shows the many differences between the simplicity of being a kid and the tough decisions and problems that adults must face every day. Jean Louise Finch, or Scout, is a very innocent character. Some of the time she does not understand what is going on in the world around her until her father, Atticus, explains it to her. Scout is

Symbolism, Themes, and Motifs in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird

1817 words - 7 pages Harper Lee wrote the novel To Kill a Mockingbird in the mid-1950. The narrator, Scout, grows alongside her brother in Maycomb County, Alabama. Growing up in a time of extreme racism, they face many struggles dealing with discrimination. In the novel, their father, Atticus Finch, defends a black man who was falsely accused of raping a white woman. Lee grew up in a time where situations happened that were similar to those in the novel. She grew

controversial issues in "To Kill a Mockingbird", by Harper Lee, racism, discrimination and social class are explored

1178 words - 5 pages In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee addresses many controversial issues. Such issues as, racism, discrimination,and social class are explored. During the 1950's in the small county of Maycomb, the mentality of most southern peoplereflected that of the nation. Most of the people were racist and discriminatory. In the novel, these ideas are explored by ayoung girl, Scout. The readers see the events that occur through her eyes. In the

A Character analysis of Scout in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird

686 words - 3 pages Scout is one of the central character’s in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. Scout is a girl who slowly changes through the course of the book. Throughout the book, Lee describes the character of Scout as being tomboyish, innocent, and aggressive. Throughout the book, readers are able to see Scout as being a tomboyish, little girl. For example, Aunt Alexandra does not approve of the way that Scout has been dressing. “Aunt Alexandra

A Character Analysis of Atticus Finch in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird

662 words - 3 pages In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee describes the character of Atticus Finch as an interesting man. Although Atticus is a flat character, he is a key character in the story. Lee Reveals Atticus to us as a loving, understanding father, as well as a respectful man in the town of Maycomb. Lee touches on Atticus’s loving personality from the start. Scout says, “Jem and I found our father satisfactory: he played with us, and

The Scottsboro Trials, Brown v. Mississippi, and trial of Tom Robinson in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird

1870 words - 7 pages The Scottsboro Trials, Brown v. Mississippi, and trial of Tom Robinson in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird The purpose of this essay is to compare three very similar cases, the Scottsboro Trials, Brown v. Mississippi, and the fictional trial of Tom Robinson in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird; and to prove why the defendant of the third trial never had a chance. Each took place in the rural South in the 1920’s and 30’s and involved the

The Hypocrisy of Humanity Depicted in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird

1318 words - 5 pages principles children will have to use later in life. The author of this novel has given the reader this story to symbolize the hypocrisy that one finds in today’s society, to show that sometimes and most of the time, the human beings talk a lot but do not look at their own actions or execute what they are teaching. Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird shows so many characteristics of today’s society. Among these characteristics, one finds racism

Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

1184 words - 5 pages States, but globally, will diminish. Racism is a targeted issue in Harper Lee’s 1930s-based novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. In Maycomb County, a fictional town in Alabama, it seemed taboo to be antiracist. When a trial involving a black man accused of raping a local white female, eyebrows are raised and tempers take over the town. At this time, it is highly unlikely for a black man to be acquitted of charges even with a substantial amount

Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

1089 words - 4 pages from dialogue, questions they’ve been asked by people around. Relationship in social also causes the problems like this to happen too. White people always racism, they usually messed up with people around and rarely respect colored people. They always think white people are the definition of perfect and others don’t which is not true. We all know that white people lead this thing, but in “To Kill A Mockingbird”, Harper has shown us not only white

Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

1564 words - 6 pages Racism was a very large part of society in the south during the 1930’s. Many colored people were thought of as less than their peers. Whites were considered better than African Americans were, and almost every white person accepted the unjust judgment. Racial discrimination hit hard in the south. Many of the characters in To Kill a Mockingbird were impacted by racial discrimination, including Calpurnia, Scout, and Tom Robinson and his family

Similar Essays

Racism, Injustice, And Discrimination In Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird

1148 words - 5 pages Racism, Injustice, and Discrimination in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird According to Shackleford, “The novel portrays a young girl's love for her father and brother and the experience of childhood during the Great Depression in a racist, segregated society, which uses superficial and materialistic values to judge outsiders, including the powerful character Boo Radley” (Shackelford). The main character relates closely with her father because

The Theme Of Injustice Depicted In Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird

1309 words - 5 pages In Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, injustice is a main theme that is reflected towards many characters. To Kill a Mockingbird, is a novel written by Harper Lee and published in the nineteen-sixties. Many characters in the story are treated unfairly in society due to racial or prejudicial attitudes. Overall these characters are innocent victims of injustice. Atticus, Boo Radley, and Tom Robinson are considered to be mockingbirds in the novel

Sexism, Prejudice, And Racism In Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird

1339 words - 6 pages Robinson, who is falsely accused of raping a white girl and is found guilty. The book is from the point of view Scout, a child, who has an advantage over most kids due to her having a lawyer as a dad, to see the other side of the story. Her father tells her in the story, “you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them.” (Lee 200). The most apparent theme of discrimination in To Kill A Mockingbird is racism, however

Sexism, Prejudice, And Racism In Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird

2879 words - 12 pages Robinson, who is falsely accused of raping a white girl and is found guilty. The book is from the point of view Scout, a child, who has an advantage over most kids due to her having a lawyer as a dad, to see the other side of the story. Her father tells her in the story, “you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them.” (Lee 200). The most apparent theme of discrimination in To Kill A Mockingbird is racism, however
Regarder un film | PREMIUM Lederbänder rund Lederband - Ø 1 / 1,5 / 2 / 2,5 / 3 / 4 / 5 mm | Chap 117 2018-08-26 02:10:01