Technology Of The 1920's Essay

642 words - 3 pages

Where would the world be without the inventions and ideas of the 1920's? The answer is, no one really knows; however, the inventions and ideas that were brought about in the 1920's are things that are used more than ever today. With the technological advancements made in the 1920's, the invention of the radio, television, automobile, and other minor advancements made the 1920's one of the most important decades of the 1900's.
The 1920's brought many advancements in technology which allowed Americans to entertain themselves at home; the radio was one of them. The radio was actually developed before the 1920's; however, it was banned during World War I and allowed to reappear after the Prohibition ended in 1919 (Events 72). After the Prohibition ended, and radio broadcasting was being brought back to life, many people started up their first stations, like Frank Conrad (Events 72). Frank Conrad's first broadcast consisted ...view middle of the document...

This was one of the best ways to receive entertainment at home because it did not require a subscription, or a monthly fee, to be used. The radio was only the beginning of home entertainment.
The television was an advancement of the radio which allowed people to see, as well as hear, what was being broadcast. There were many people who contributed to the development of the television. One of those men who contributed was Vladmir Zworykin. In 1924, Zworykin patented the kinescope for use in televisions (Feinstein 54). While working on his design for the television, Vladmir Zworykin was hired by RCA to do research and build his television (Television par 14). Another pioneer for the television was Charles Jenkins. Charles Jenkins was one of the first people to obtain a broadcasting license from the government for his station located in Wheaton, Maryland (Visionary par 7). As to when the first shown to the public, there are a few discrepancies. According to one source, AT&T demonstrated their television to the public in 1927 (Television par. 10) and the other says it was shown in 1928 in New York from WZXAD (Feinstein 54). Some of the televisions, when first sold, were sent to owners as a do-it-yourself project which had to be assembled at home (Television par. 10), unlike today where televisions are bought preassembled. Until about April 9, 1927 the television was a rare sight (Visionary par. 9). With the popularity of the television rising, broadcasts began to be made across America. One of the first broadcasts involved Herbert Hoover, who was the first person to be seen on the television (Visionary par. 9); this broadcast was between the FRC and Bell Laboratories (Visionary par. 9). After this broadcast, some stations were doing regular broadcasts of simple things, such as smoke pouring out of a chimney or the first cartoons (Television par. 10). Sometimes there would even be broadcasts of "stick figures and silhouettes"
(Visionary par. 7). These programs were often referred to as being "simple, repetitive, and ultimately boring" by many people (Television par. 11). However, there were some breakthroughs in television programming.

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