The Americans With Disabilities Act (Ada)

1452 words - 6 pages

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is one of the most significant laws in American History. Before the ADA was passed, employers were able to deny employment to a disabled worker, simply because he or she was disabled. With no other reason other than the person's physical disability, they were turned away or released from a job. The ADA gives civil rights protections to individuals with disabilities similar to those provided to individuals on the basis of race, color, sex, national origin, age, and religion. The act guarantees equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities in public accommodations, employment, transportation, State and local government services, and telecommunications. The ADA not only opened the door for millions of Americans to get back into the workplace, it paved the road for new facilities in the workplace, new training programs, and created jobs designed for a disabled society (Frierson, 1990). This paper will discuss disabilities covered by the ADA, reasonable accommodations employers must take to accommodate individuals with disabilities, and the actions employers can take when considering applicants who have disabilities.
Any company with 15 or more employees must be in full compliance with the ADA. The ADA, "prohibits private employers, state and local governments, employment agencies, and labor unions from discriminating against qualified individuals with disabilities in job application procedures, hiring, firing, advancement, compensation, job training, and other terms, conditions and privileges of employment" (U.S. EEOC, 2007). This includes applicants for employment and existing employees.
Individuals are considered to have a "disability" if they have a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities such as seeing, hearing, speaking, walking, breathing, performing manual tasks, learning, caring for oneself, and working, has a record of such an impairment, or is regarded as having such an impairment. Contagious diseases such as HIV+ and AIDS are considered conditions of being disabled (DeCenzo & Robbins 2005). An alcoholic is a person with a disability and is protected by the ADA if he or she is qualified to perform the essential functions of the job (U.S. Department of Justice, 2006). However, an employer can discipline, discharge or deny employment to an alcoholic whose use of alcohol adversely affects job performance or conduct. An employer may also prohibit the use of alcohol in the workplace and require that employees not be under the influence of alcohol. Individuals, discriminated against because they have a known association or relationship with a person with a disability, are also protected under the ADA (U.S. Department of Justice, 2006). For example, this provision would protect a person whose spouse has a disability from being denied employment because of an employer's unfounded assumption that the applicant would use...

Find Another Essay On The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

Reasonable Accommodation In The Workplace Under the American with Disabilities Act (ADA)

1625 words - 7 pages Reasonable Accommodation in the Work Place Under ADA      There may be as many as one thousand different disabilities that affect over forty-three million Americans. Of all the laws and regulations governing the treatment of those Americans the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) is the most recent major law. It was passed in 1990 and although it is spelled out in a technical ADA manual that is several

The Americans with Disabilities Act is Only the First Step

1688 words - 7 pages to succeed. These slogans, which we so easily state, do not tell the full story, however. Racism and prejudice abound in "the land of the free" and can be witnessed on an almost daily basis. The government endeavors to remedy the inequalities through programs such as the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which is a noble attempt to present all people with a more equal playing field. This program, and others like it, are effective, but it is

The Americans with Disabilities Act and its impact on athletics

1921 words - 8 pages athletics.Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C. .1681 et seq.) prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs receiving Federal financial assistance. Athletics are considered an integral part of an institution's education program and are therefore covered by this law. However, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) contain no specific exemption for professional sports. During the floor debate on the ADA, no such

Section 504 and The Americans with Disabilities Act

899 words - 4 pages the right of disabled Americans to dignity of self-respect as equal and contributing members of society and to end the virtual isolation of millions of children and adults.” (Smith, 2001) In all, Section 504 has significantly altered the common and legal perception of civilization. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is probably the most comprehensible formulation of disabled individuals’ rights. The ADA officially became a law July 26

The Americans with Disabilities Act Impact on Business

1506 words - 7 pages people. Works Cited 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design. Washington, D.C.: Dept. of Justice, 2010. Web. "Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)." Civil Rights Office. US Department of Education, 1990. Web. 20 May 2014. "AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990, AS AMENDED." Department of Justice, n.d. Web. 20 May 2014. Deleire, Thomas. "The Wage and Employment Effects of the Americans with Disabilities Act." The Journal of Human Resources

Reasonable Accommodation By Employers As Required By The Americans With Disabilities Act

1333 words - 6 pages way possible for its people and the ADA is just one more supporting hand that we hold in order to give everyone the best chance to succeed. All accommodations will remain up to date and above the standard for all disabled employees and visitors to any DWI establishment.ReferencesBoston University, (1997). The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Retrieved December 11, 2008, from http://www.bu.edu/cpr/reasaccom/whatlaws-adaact.html#TIUnited

The American with Disabilities Act

2277 words - 9 pages , including court and police” (NAD 1). Obviously, because deaf and hard of hearing have limited hearing, their communication and social skills are below the expectation of a common hearing person. Thus, most of these people are ignored, neglected, and discriminated against. However, as a citizen protected by the American with Disabilities Act (ADA), deaf and hard of hearing individuals deserve equal rights and must be accommodated for as a disabled

Workforce adapting to comply with the American with Disabilities Act

2323 words - 9 pages MILLENNIUMS WORKFORCE RIGHTSAbstractFor years, big companies have set the rules for which employees had to follow in orderto maintain their jobs. Discrimination for language barrier, race, color, age, disabilityand more was nothing easy to fight against; until The American with Disabilities Act of1990 (ADA) came into effect. Such an important law has brought many changes in alldirections within management, employees, hiring process, ergonomics

IDEA Individuals With Disabilities Education Act

878 words - 4 pages automatically qualify a student for special education services under the IDEA. The disability must result in the student needing additional or different services to participate in school. For example, a child who is diagnosed autistic. Children with disabilities who qualify for special education are also automatically protected by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Research shows

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

2815 words - 11 pages In 1975 federal law mandated the Education for all Handicapped Children Act, also known as EHA or Public Law 94-142. This law originated as a way to ensure that students with disabilities receive an appropriate and free public education. Grants were given to states for the education of children with disabilities. In 1975 a free, appropriate education meant that all individuals that were identified as having a handicap were entitled to have an

IDEA (Individual with Disabilities Education Act)

2671 words - 11 pages IDEA Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Diversity and InclusionIDEA (Individual with Disabilities Education Act)October , 2009The FAPE (A Free Appropriate Public Education) is the first component of the IDEA. It applies to all children, regardless of severity of their disability (Gargiulo, 2006, p.48). All children must be provided an education that caters to their distinctive needs at no cost to the parent(s), guardian(s), or

Similar Essays

The Americans With Disabilities Act (Ada) In The Workplace

1740 words - 7 pages People with disabilities have become an integral part of the workforce. The ADA forbids discrimination against people with disabilities when recruiting, hiring, training, and compensating employees (Sotoa & Kleiner, 2013). The ADA prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in employment, transportation, public accommodation, communications, and governmental and establishes requirements for telecommunications relay services

The Americans With Disabilities Act (Ada): A Good Start

1177 words - 5 pages were viewed together by the Supreme Court to determine whether the case was valid. Although it was filed under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), they transferred it to the fourteenth amendment. The file under the ADA was dismissed as judges ruled that the ADA only applied to private sector business (Board of Trustees v. Garrett). Therefore when sent under the fourteenth amendment it was decided that there was no validity due to the

Ada. American With Disabilities Act Essay

1758 words - 7 pages There may be as many as one thousand different disabilities that affect over forty-three million Americans. Of all the laws and regulations governing the treatment of those Americans the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) is the most recent major law. It was passed in 1990 and although it is spelled out in a technical ADA manual that is several hundred pages in length. Two of ADA's two major sections, Titles II and III concern the operation of

Americans With Disabilities Act Essay

1507 words - 6 pages The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is intended to bring an end to discrimination against individuals with disabilities in three distinct areas: employment, public services, and public accommodations. This law was enacted in 1990 and is enforced by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Fitchburg State College stated it simply, "The ADA was established to strip away the barriers that have restricted people with disabilities
the evolution of photojournalism | Stereotypes In Media | Administrator