The Benevolent Creature Of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

1942 words - 8 pages

Victor’s creation is described, in the book Frankenstein, in multiple ways, including fiend, wretch, and even devil. These are all inappropriate terms when all of the creature’s actions are taken in perspective. The creature of Frankenstein is a caring, compassionate being that is forced into the barbaric way that he lives his life through the prejudices of his creator, Victor. The term that best represents this being is, as Victor originally states, a "new species," and through the neglect by Victor and others around him who couldn’t overlook the crude design of the bodily features, this "new species" was forced to find its place in the world only through revenge, primarily targeted at Victor.

While Victor was preparing to create new life, he clearly expected greatness in his creation. His hope was that "a new species would bless me as its creator and source; many happy and excellent natures would owe their being to me" (32). Even as he looked upon his creation before inspiring the spark of life, he saw a benevolent, happy creature that could add to the development of human society. He knew full well what his creation looked like, but still felt that it would become an accepted new species that could call him their father. He was the creator of a whole new group of creatures. He did not create the being that later developed into the monster when he constructed the creature out of miscellaneous parts. The creature he made was exactly what he intended: one with a happy and excellent nature, and one that could "bless him as creator and source."
Even after being rejected by Victor upon coming to life, the creature still clung to his "happy and excellent nature" (32). Upon giving the spark of life to the creature, Victor immediately saw the yellow shine of the creature’s eyes, and "breathless horror and disgust filled (his) heart" (34). When Victor retired to his bed to abandon his creation, the creature appeared in his room. The creature approached the bed with one arm outstretched. Then he grinned. Victor ran away in the belief that this creature was a vengeful one that is attempting to detain and harm him. Upon closer inspection of the creature’s actions, there is a much different intent expressed by the creature. The creature came into being that night, and knew nothing of what or when he was. Just as an infant does with the first people it is around, most often the parents, he reached out to Victor, the only parent figure he could find. He was looking only for compassion and direction in a world that he could not understand. Probably the most important event in this scene is the creature’s grin. Victor does not seem to understand the meaning of such a grin from a newly created creature. Since the creature was made of human parts, we can only assume that it would have the same facial expressions as a human, and therefore, we could only judge his intent based on what we know already of human expressions. Yet Victor goes completely against...

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