The Counter Culture Of The 1920's

1551 words - 6 pages

The counter culture of the 1920’s has affected the way the American lifestyle is today. Counter culture is a culture that primarily consists of younger people, with values and lifestyles opposing those of the original established culture. (Dictionary.com) A need for change. The 1920’s are also known as the “Jazz Age,” which was coined by F. Scott Fitzgerald, and the “Roaring Twenties.” It was a decade of change. (Hakim, 41) The counterculture of the 1920’s resulted from the Age of Jazz, Flappers, and the Harlem Renaissance.
Out of the streets of New Orleans, a new form of music arose. This new type of music was not known as African or European, but simply American. It was jazz. In 1900 jazz first developed, but it wasn’t until the 1920’s when jazz began to spread across the Nation and eventually across the World. (Hakim, 57) The word jazz itself did not originate in New Orleans along with the music. The term first showed up in sports columns in San Francisco. Most people from New Orleans never even heard the word until they left their homes. Eventually, like the music, the word jazz and this new phenomenon had stretched out across the nation. Jazz was and is known to be the most predominant form of music of the 1920’s. The television had not yet been invented, but rhythm and drum beat of Africa, but also contained the instruments and heritage of Europe. People everywhere had their radios to listen and dance to the music. Some listened to the newly found jazz music everyday. (Schoenberg, 10) Some people went to jazz clubs. At the jazz clubs the musicians were primarily black and the audience was mostly white. There were many clubs that were located in Harlem, which was on the north end of Manhattan. Almost all of the great jazz musicians played in Harlem at some point in their lives. One of the most famous jazz musicians was Louis Armstrong. Louis was born in New Orleans where he grew up and learned to play the trumpet. He also learned to sing. Because of his long improvised solos, he inspired jazz so that long solos became an important part of jazz pieces and performances. (Cayton, 462) Armstrong was the king of jazz trumpet players. The new style that he created gave a voice-like quality to his horn. (Hakim, 58) Although Jazz was very popular itself, a majority of the fans and listeners were younger people. Flappers were commonly known during this time. They danced to the jazz music with a whole new style.
A flapper was a modern woman of the 1920’s with bobbed hair, short skirts, and dramatic make-up. (sparknotes.com) The flapper was also used to represent a new type of young woman. It represented a woman that was bold, rebellious, and energetic. Only a small percentage of American women were flappers. The image of the flapper had a huge impact on the rest of the nation’s fashion and behavior. Most women began to cut their hair short. It was called bobbing. Many parents wouldn’t allow it. To the older...

Find Another Essay On The Counter Culture of the 1920's

Consumer Culture: Describes how radio, advertising, automobiles, and movies effected the consumer culture of the 1920's

926 words - 4 pages because most were experiencing times of prosperity, families had more money. The times were right for another change, a cultural change, and thus began the era of consumer culture that is a staple of America even today.Since one's work could no longer ensure satisfaction or contentment, people began to look for other avenues of gratification outside the workplace. Industry, too, was experiencing the stress of changing times because they had the

Technology of the 1920's Essay

642 words - 3 pages Where would the world be without the inventions and ideas of the 1920's? The answer is, no one really knows; however, the inventions and ideas that were brought about in the 1920's are things that are used more than ever today. With the technological advancements made in the 1920's, the invention of the radio, television, automobile, and other minor advancements made the 1920's one of the most important decades of the 1900's. The 1920's

Technology of the 1920's

1145 words - 5 pages movies before this, no sound was used. This changed when, in 1926, the Warner Brothers partnered with Western Electric to develop a new type of movie with sound. The sound effects, talking, and music, were recorded onto a record, which were synced with the movie in the theatre. Throughout the 1920’s, many people felt that murderers who were sentenced to death experienced unnecessary pain before they died. The state of Nevada developed a new

Music Of The 1920's

1540 words - 6 pages Megan Will Mrs. Fettig English 10B 1 March 2001         From the mournful melodies of the blues to the soulful sounds of jazz, the development of music in the 1920’s truly defined music as we know it today. The twenties, with their own glamour and pizzazz, gave music a newfound freedom to grow and prosper. America was credited as the “home of the jazz”, and names of influential American musicians were known from the Louisiana bayous to

Inventions of the 1920's

1711 words - 7 pages inventors, the reason these great inventions worked, included many average men. Some of the top inventors of the decade included: Carl Eliason, John Larson, Earle Dickson, John Taliaferro Thompson, and Alexander Fleming (All sources). These inventors worked hard to make life enjoyable and safe, and in the 1920’s many great inventions were born; some of these inventions included the television, band aid, penicillin, Thompson sub-machine gun, and

Woodstock: The Rise of the Counter Culture

1858 words - 7 pages Psychedelic Drugs, Hippie Counterculture, Speed
and Phénobarbital Treatment of Sedative-Hypnotic Dependence: A Journey to the Haight Ashbury in the Sixties saying, “they blended Eastern mysticism, Native American rituals, and psychedelic drug use into what would variously be called the "hippie movement" or the "psychedelic drug counter- culture" (Wesson, 154). Along with other members of the peace movement, it was particularly the hippie population that

The Women of the 1920's

1393 words - 6 pages Jordan stated that the ladies before the 1920's wore dresses that covered up most of their skin, had pinned up long hair, were very modest, had chaperones and had men make all of their decisions (1). "On both sides of the Atlantic they'd been struggling against the kind of rigidly sexist culture that meant a women could be arrested for smoking a cigarette while walking down a public street" (Judith 1). The women of the 1920's were independent

The Automobile Revolution of the 1920’s

1115 words - 5 pages at the end of the Greatest Generation (Generation Timelines Starting with the 1920’s; poetic_lala), the Automobile Revolution. The ‘Automobile Revolution’ massively impacted the United States, from environmental issues all the way to how people lived their everyday lives. During the twenties a major technological revolution had come forth into the spotlight, Henry Ford’s assembly line. The widely acclaimed assembly line allowed for

The Automobile Revolution of the 1920’s

1272 words - 5 pages happened at the end of the Greatest Generation (“Generation Timelines Starting with the 1920’s”; poetic_lala), the Automobile Revolution. The ‘Automobile Revolution’ massively impacted the United States, from environmental issues all the way to how people lived their everyday lives. (“1920’s”; Wikipedia) During the twenties a major technological revolution had come forth into the spotlight, Henry Ford’s assembly line. The widely acclaimed assembly line

The Flaming Youth of the 1920's

694 words - 3 pages grew into a necessary house hold furniture during this time. Since people of that time had no televisions or internet the quickest way they could hear news, music, or about a new store, was through the radio. Another immensely popular invention was the auto mobile. In the 1920s there were about nine million auto mobiles in the United States, but during the 1920’s that number just about tripled. Everyone wanted one. People were taking loan, and

The 1920's

702 words - 3 pages President Calvin Coolidge once said, "The business of America is business" (Napolo 35). During the 1920's, America saw a shift toward widespread business expansion and economy prosperity. Economic expansion created new, booming businesses and thriving business profits which in turn raised the standard of living for many Americans. During this time in America, businessmen advocated a return to laissez-faire economics, less government

Similar Essays

The Counter Culture Of The 1960's

1357 words - 6 pages led.  This trend spread and eventually progressed into a nationwide movement, popularly known as the Hippie Movement. The Movement created its own entirely new sub culture that enthralled the nation. The Hippie Movement of the 1960’s transformed people’s perspectives on cultural matters, moral values, and created a new unique genre of fine arts. The Hippies were driven by many motivations both socially and politically. They wanted a peaceful and

Counter Culture In The 1950's Essay

1903 words - 8 pages a sense of comfort. There was a minority, however, that did not quite accept this conservative conformity that had swept across the nation; some of these people took the shape of artists and writers. During the 1950s, what became known as the "Beat Generation" inspired the challenging of and rebelling against conventional America. The Beat Generation was a form of counter-culture inspired by discontent with the current state of life

The Birth Of Mass Culture: The Rise Of The Radio In The 1920’s

2374 words - 9 pages Throughout the 1920’s, a new era of pop culture was ushered in as America recovered from its involvement in the First World War. Within this era, society was dominated by the desire to express oneself and live lavishly while free of structural constraint, and this new pursuit of freedom was displayed within the evolution of jazz, flapper fashions, and an increased obsession with entertainment. While each of these events undoubtedly played a

1960's Counter Culture In Anne Moody's The Coming Of Age In Mississippi

2163 words - 9 pages The counter-culture movement of the 1960s was a reaction caused by the historical amnesia from the 1950s. The historical amnesia was created to deny the racial acts of the 1950s. Because the United States began the number one world power after World War II, America needed to have a “free” image to the world. Thus, the white American public suppressed the present acts of racism by imposing an atmosphere of a peace; otherwise America would be seen
Lot of 50 -- New 1/10 oz Liberty Design .999 Fine Silver Rounds Tube Roll | Freundin (2) | 4,0 su 5 stelle