The Importance Of Geographic Isolation Essay

1400 words - 6 pages

Although Darwin and Mayr both contributed enormously to the topic of speciation, they had two totally different views on the main mechanism driving it. Darwin noticed geographic isolation but discounted any importance in it believing natural selection to be the driving force, while Mayr believed that geographic isolation was the driving force of speciation and founded the theory of allopatric speciation. For decades Mayr's idea has been the traditional method thought to result in the highest amount of speciation, but recent support has shifted from allopatry and Darwins gradualism to rapid and sporadic periods of speciation with periods of relative equilibrium regardless of geographic barriers.

Darwin, the father of evolution was amazingly correct or close to the truth on most of his theories regardless of modern day proofs such as genetics. Darwin first noticed a pattern of speciation on the Galapagos islands when the vice-governor, Mr Lawson, told him that he could tell what island each of the tortoises were from simply by looking at them. Darwin found this unbelievable, until his own observations confirmed Mr. Lawson's claim (Schilthuizen 2001). Darwin believed that natural selection was the driving force behind speciation. "The passage from one stage of difference to another and higher stage may be, in some cases, due merely to the long-continued action of different physical conditions in two different regions; but I have not much faith in this view, and I attribute the passage of a variety, form a state in which it differs very slightly form its parent to one in which it differs more, to the action of natural selection." (Darwin 1859).

In order for natural selection to occur there needed to be large populations for it to select from, enough time for divergence, and some competition for resources. "Nor do I believe that any great physical change, as of climate, or any unusual degree of isolation to check immigration, is actually necessary to produce new and unoccupied places for natural selection to fill up by modifying and improving some of the varying inhabitants. For as all the inhabitants of each country are struggling together with nicely balanced forces, extremely slight modifications in the structure or habits of one inhabitant would often give it an advantage over others; and still further modifications of the same kind would often still further increase the advantage" (Darwin 1859). Darwin is describing sympatry in this paragraph and the competition and conquering of the parental generation by their "modified decedents" reducing its numbers and thereby its chance of further variation and improvement. The more branching of the groups the more destruction of the earlier less improved subgroups (Darwin 1859). Darwin believed that isolation was probably important but only to "check immigration of better adapted organisms" and could eventually "retard the production of species through natural selection, by...

Find Another Essay On The Importance of Geographic Isolation

The Use of Geographic Information Systems in Real Estate Appraisal

5038 words - 20 pages The Use of Geographic Information Systems in Real Estate Appraisal Abstract Appraisers need to show the reasoning behind their value opinions by discussing important spatial relationships and their likely effect on value. Geographic information systems (GIS) can be used to analyze these relationships and to show why a client should select an appraiser who has this level of information. Gilbert Castle has noted that real estate is

Richard III: The Tragedy of Isolation

1210 words - 5 pages   The real tragedy of Richard III lies in the progressive isolation of its protagonist.   From the very opening of the play when Richard III enters "solus", the protagonist's isolation is made clear. Richard's isolation progresses as he separates himself from the other characters and breaks the natural bonds between Man and nature through his efforts to gain power. The first scene of the play begins with a soliloquy, which emphasizes

Effects of Isolation in "The Scarlet Letter"

661 words - 3 pages The Scarlet Letter Isolation can affect people in many different ways, for example, it could affect someone physically or emotionally. Isolation can drastically affect people in many different areas of their life. Hester is affected by isolation both emotionally and physically. In The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorn Hester becomes alienated, isolated, physically and emotionally because of the red letter that she wears on her chest

Isolation as the Root of Hamlet's Torment

1667 words - 7 pages Isolation as the Root of Hamlet's Torment Does Hamlet stand alone? Does this magnate of English literature hold any bond of fellowship with those around him, or does he forge through his quandaries of indecision, inaction and retribution in solitude? Though the young Dane interacts with Shakespeare's entire slate of characters, most of his discourse lies beneath a cloud of sarcasm, double meaning and contempt. As each member of Claudius

Frankenstein- The Effects of Isolation and Rejection

741 words - 3 pages The Effect of Isolation and Rejection In the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, the monster is born more or less with the mind of a baby. He craves attention, love and nurturing as all babies do. The monster was left with no one to teach him anything, and to understand the world solely on his own. After observing, and slowly figuring out how the world works, he was unable to imitate because no one accepted him, including his creator

Theme of Isolation in The Awakening

855 words - 3 pages Theme of Isolation in The Awakening       One theme apparent in Kate Chopin's novel, The Awakening, is the consequence of solitude when independence is chosen over conformity. The novel's protagonist, Edna Pontellier, is faced with this consequence after she embarks on a journey of self-discovery. "As Edna's ability to express herself grows, the number of people who can understand her newfound language shrinks" (Ward 3). Edna's

The Geographic, Political, and Ethnic Impact European Colonialism Has Played on the Present History of Africa

1483 words - 6 pages There is an ongoing debate on how the current political and economic failures in Africa can be traced back to the advent of colonialism. There is a great deal of evidence that illustrates the impact that colonialism and foreign intervention has had a negative effect on the development of present history of Africa. This essay will attempt to examine the geographic, political and ethnic impact European colonialism has played on the development of

How Did the Geographic Features of Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia Impact Civilization Development?

2109 words - 8 pages Section A: Plan of Investigation During the years of 3500 BC to 2500 BC, the geography of a land often impacted a civilizations development in great measures. Depending on the resources available or the detriments present due to certain topographical characteristics like rivers or deserts, a civilization could flourish or collapse. By studying the geographic features of growing societies like the Nile, Euphrates, and Tigris Rivers as well as

The effects of social isolation in the Invisible Man

945 words - 4 pages Social Isolation, a state or process in which persons, groups, or cultures lose or do not have communication or cooperation with one another, often resulting in open conflict. In H.G Wells’ 1897 novel The Invisible Man, the main character, Griffin, is socially isolated due to a condition that has forced him to stay out of the scrutinizing eye of society .As the novel progresses, the effects of social isolation begin to take form in Griffin’s

Isolation in "Lord of the Flies" vs. the movie "Castaway"

1007 words - 4 pages Throughout the novel Lord of the Flies and the film "Castaway" one of the main themes is most certainly seen as isolation, both social and physical. Isolation could be defined as the "feeling of being alone, or disliked," as well as "a state of separation between persons or groups," which most often results in open conflict. Both of these definitions are evident between the two stranded island tales. The isolation throughout these stories may be

The Theme of Isolation in Robert Frost's The Mending Wall

802 words - 3 pages The Theme of Isolation in Robert Frost's The Mending Wall Robert Frost's "The Mending Wall" is a comment on the nature of our society. In this poem, Frost examines the way in which we interact with one another and how we function as a whole. For Frost, the world is often one of isolation. Man has difficulty communicating and relating to one another. As a result, we have a tendency to shut ourselves off from others. In the absence of

Similar Essays

The Geographic Power Of Countr Essay

815 words - 3 pages Every country has geographic power, although some countries have more than others. Countries with more power often have a valuable supply of natural resources and human resources. The attitude of the people in the country and the problems that the country is faced with are also factors in determining its geographic power. Poor attitudes and many problems may, however, be altered when the human or natural resources are improved. Therefore, these

The Cultural Affects Of National Geographic

1368 words - 5 pages Thailand is a country enveloped in much mystery and cultural tradition. This fact is reflected very clearly in a series of pictures taken from the article, “The Many Faces of Thailand” in the February 1996 issue of the National Geographic magazine, titled, “Into the Heart of Glaciers” I will attempt to analyze the way in which the pictures portray the richness of Thailand’s culture and people and prove this statement about the National

The Privilege Of Isolation Essay

614 words - 3 pages room for individuals to fully grasp the importance of words and of themselves. He states, “Instead of a soul, membership in a crowd. Instead of wisdom, data” (173). In the existence of gigabytes, we are not required to think critically and self-reflect; we accumulate large quantities of information without the need for quality. Our belonging to social networking sites inhibits us from looking into ourselves by forcing us to blend in. It may just be

The Age Of Isolation Essay

1630 words - 7 pages Kirthan Reddy Mrs. Jones AP English Language and Composition 26 February 2014 The Age of Isolation Through the years, people have grown to have an increasing reliance on electronics through almost every aspect in their daily lives. Technology has provided us with an effortless way to communicate, but with its advantages come major drawbacks. Although electronic devices allow for a quick and easy form of communication, they cannot build the
Thriller | バーベキュー用品 | My Life in Film