Truman Capote's Questionable Murder Involvement And His Novel, In Cold Blood

1007 words - 4 pages

On November 15, 1959, in the state of Kansas, an innocent family of four, known as the Clutter family, was murdered surprisingly for the desperate need of money. The two killers were convicted and sent to be executed which led to an inspired author who decided to write a book, but seemed to end up more attached than he was supposed. Many surmised that the author Truman Capote really wanted the killers dead to go off and finish his journey to publish his novel.
The truth of this theory is in question. Capote was also known for bending the truth or creating scenes that have never happened maybe wanting to create more interest for his book. There wasn't any evidence showing readers and viewers that Truman Capote wanted these two murderers dead. He actually showed compassion for them, but yet at the same time he was mainly focused on his writing.
The interest Capote could have had for writing this book could be him wanting to know what were the two murderers could've been thinking for murdering the whole family and not have any relation with them nor a motive.
The big question of this was whether Truman Capote was attached to the two murderers or not. Truman Capote could possibly have been playing it off to get the answers from them before he ended up being left with an unfinished book. But maybe he was above lying and manipulation maybe he was sincere than everyone believed. Some believed he empathized with Perry's personalities or characteristics.
It also came to show that Capote became more attached to Perry than DIck or in other words he showed more sympathy . This could've happened because Truman Capote and Perry Smith both shared a similar past. Both of their mothers were abusive to them. Perry had it a little more extreme which could've led some kind of attachment to each other. This connection sunk into Capote which led him into wanting to help him more.
Maybe it was possible that just minutes before the execution, It started to kill Capote. That he was so selfish to think so badly of the killers but somehow lead to caring more for them. Capote started to feel guilty that from his beginning thoughts such as how he hated the killers for murdering the whole family for their money and not getting anything out of it. He may have saw how Perry Smith was suffering so much that he thought he could've have helped him. Maybe he was trying to prove a point that even when someone does extremely wrong, You can still see the good in worst of people. Truman Capote may have thought at least once or twice that he could help Perry...

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